WARNING:  If this information causes any crisis or distress, call the Indian Residential Schools Crisis Line at 1-866-925-4419



OVERVIEW

The Anishinabek Nation expresses its sincere gratitude to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) for funding the “Honouring Our Children, Families, and Communities Affected by Indian Residential Schools Project,” allowing the Anishinabek Nation to commemorate the experiences of its citizens who attended Indian residential school with the objectives of fostering healing and reconciliation.

The Anishinabek Nation is very pleased to present the commemoration and education resources that have been developed under this project which are designed to:

* Honour and validate the healing and reconciliation of former students, their families, and their communities.

* Enhance education and understanding about Indian residential schools with the goal to improve relationships between First Nations and Canadians.

* Ensure the legacy of Indian residential schools and the experiences of former students, their families, and their communities are affirmed.

* Provide information about Indian residential schools in a format that reaches a wide audience, age ranges, and literacy levels.

* Memorialize the Indian residential school experience and develop a place where healing and education can begin to occur.


COMMEMORATION

The Anishinabek Nation has constructed a legacy monument at its head office located on Nipissing First Nation.  Unveiled on March 25, 2013 through an honouring ceremony, the legacy monument pays tribute to all Anishinabek citizens who attended Indian residential school, their families, and communities; and memorializes the Indian residential school experience.

The legacy monument is designed to be a place where healing and education about Indian residential schools and its affects can be shared, understood, and never forgotten.
 
 
 
 
* There is a consent form that can be completed, for those who have not already done so, by Anishinabek Nation Indian Residential School Students (living or deceased) or an authorized family member on their behalf to have their name included on the monument. To date we have already received over 75 names of survivors.
 
Please click the link below for the consent form:
 
 
 
 EDUCATION

The Anishinabek Nation has created a variety of resources to promote knowledge and awareness about the Indian residential school system and its lasting legacy on the former students and their families, the Anishinabek Nation, and Canada as a whole.  These resources include:


* “Little Butterfly Girl: An Indian Residential School Story” that portrays the fictional story of a little girl who attended Indian residential school by presenting what her life was like before, during, and after attending Indian residential school.  Illustrated with beautiful artwork, this narrative picture book is available in English, Anishinaabemowin, and French.
 
                

* Educational videos exploring the present day realities and aftermath of the Indian residential school system including inter-generational trauma; the healing journey of an Anishinabek survivor and her daughter; reclaiming the identity, language, and culture of the Anishinabek that was not permitted during the Indian residential school era; and why understanding about this legacy is central to the Anishinabek and all Canadians moving forward.  One video is in Anishinaabemowin.
 
                                                            

* Print and electronic materials examining the history of the Indian residential school system; the psychological and inter-generational impacts from the Indian residential school system; and educational resources on the Indian residential school system.
 
            

* This educational website accessible through the Union of Ontario Indians home page which houses the above resources and includes information about the Government of Canada’s Apology, the Indian Residential School Settlement Agreement, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, mental health resources, legal resources, and various available educational resources to learn more about Indian residential schools.

* Poster series showcasing the education resources that have been developed about the Indian residential school system and its legacy.
 
 
                                                                           


The Anishinabek Nation honours all of our citizens, living and deceased, who attended Indian residential school, and their families.  We honour the healing journey that we must take together.  We respect and honour the past, present and future.

2013 Indian Residential Schools Commemoration Project Video Playlist: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLaQ0wUvBUPeTkCYuPCOZVZoSjivNQFilW
Click “Play all” to view each of the five videos in sequence.

Grand Council Chief Madahbee on Residential Schools: http://youtu.be/7q-Q-TLWyms
In this video Anishinabek Nation Grand Council Chief Patrick Wedaseh Madahbee discusses how Residential School has affected Anishinabek Nation citizens, and how the Nation is working towards reclaiming fundamental elements, such as language, governance, traditional customs and practices.


Mother and daughter: Residential School and Inter-Generational Effects: http://youtu.be/v2QlRj5tSqc
In this video M'Chigeeng First Nation citizens Krystine Abel and her mother Eve Abel talk about how Eve's experience as a student at St. Joseph's residential school in Spanish, Ontario in the 1950's had an impact on Eve's parenting and Krystine's sense of identity as an Anishinaabe Kwe.

Deputy Grand Council Chief Glen Hare on Residential Schools (English): http://youtu.be/FDOW3D3M_tM
In this video, Anishinabek Nation Deputy Grand Council Chief Glen Hare discusses how Anishinabek citizens lost their language, culture and spiritual practices at Residential Schools, and how the Nation can working towards reclaiming these - particularly via Anishinaabemowin language instruction in their own classrooms.


Deputy Grand Council Chief Glen Hare on Residential Schools (Anishinaabemowin): http://youtu.be/rBxlrzJRaeI
In this Anishinaabemowin language video, Anishinabek Nation Deputy Grand Council Chief Glen Hare discusses how Anishinabek citizens lost their language, culture and spiritual practices at Residential Schools, and how the Nation can working towards reclaiming these - particularly via Anishinaabemowin language instruction in their own classrooms.


Brian Nootchtai discusses inter-generational effects of residential school: http://youtu.be/tqPhm63lEaI
In this video, Brian Nootchtai, Mental Health Case Worker at the N'Mninoeyaa Aboriginal Health Access Centre in Cutler, Ontario, discusses the inter-generational effects of Residential School, and notes that validating the residential school experience - as individuals, families and communities is an important step to healing
 

 

Related Links and Contact Information

For more information on the Truth and Reconciliation Commission please contact:
http://www.trc.ca/websites/trcinstitution/index.php?p=3     
Toll Free 1-888-872-5554     
email: info@trc.ca 

For more information on Health Canada’s Indian Residential School Health Support Program please contact: 
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/index-eng.php
Telephone:    Toll Free 1-888-301-6426
 
For emotional and crisis referral services you can contact the 24 hour National Crisis Line at:
Telephone:     Toll Free 1-866-925-4419
 
For further information on the Anishinabek Nation Indian Residential School monument please contact the Union of Ontario Indians at:
Toll Free 1-877-702-5200     ext. 2308    
Union of Ontario Indians.

Anishinabek Educational Institute.

Anishinabek Nation Seventh Generation Charity.


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